Military Form Over Substance

No matter what people say about John Kelly’s remarks regarding Robert E. Lee – we all sort of understand him. We always default toward a feeling of respect regarding military men. They have great posture and perfect manners – always calling people ma’am and sir. Their uniforms are attractive and perfectly pressed not to mention the colorful medals that often accompany them. They march well in large powerful groups with shiny swords or rifles. When we see them at ceremonial events – parades or burials they are taciturn, appearing respectful of the flag or the coffin. The Germans in the 1930’s grew intoxicated by their glory.

We (too) are suckers for their appearance and countenance.

They may have spent the day torturing prisoners at Abu Graib prison or murdering innocent villagers at My Lai (Vietnam). Every culture forgives them of their stupidity and war crimes as soon as they see them up close looking pristine and noble. How dare we question the good intentions of a man on a horse looking dignified and proud even if it’s just a statue? To doubt the majestic warrior on his horse is to doubt all marching men with clean uniforms. We’re taught to revere all these people.

General Kelly got caught up in this unavoidable attraction to the military form just like the press secretary who, in defending him said – we should never question the intent or veracity of a general. Of course not – not with all those beautiful medals and impeccably clean shoes. Her reverence for Kelly is no different than Kelly’s reverence for Lee. Lee was famously dressed to the nines in his fanciest uniform when he surrendered to Grant. Even Grant who had known him for years and hated slavery found him to be irresistible.

The civil war should have taught us that we must consider what these people do rather than just how they look. If that didn’t teach you then maybe you want to question your judgment by looking at this guy:

He must have been a smooth operator. I’m sure he had a clean gun and called all his superiors sir. Jochen Peiper was a field officer in the Wafffen SS. He received the Knights Cross of the Iron Cross (a big deal). He was later imprisoned for 12 years for war crimes.

How about this guy?

Look at that immaculate uniform. Who wouldn’t applaud him for his service if he appeared at a football game? If you didn’t you’d be seen as unpatriotic. He is currently on trial for desertion.

Let’s face it the US is the least patriotic country in the world. People are just as happy to employ a foreigner as long as he costs less. They are just as happy to buy a foreign made product. They abhor mandatory military service and they would riot in the streets if their taxes were increased to pay for a military engagement. It seems that to make up for it we all wave flags and stand for the anthem at football games.

Form over substance wins every time.

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